9 myths about evaluation

Dianne Newman and Robert Brown (1996) have inspected myths related to ethics. Let’s delve straight into the topic by checking out these myths.

  • Personal ethical perfection precedes serious ethical thinking
    But that’s simply impossible, so one shouldn’t expect to become ethically perfect ever
  • Ethics is just valuing one’s values and all values are equal
    Some values are better and more universal than others
  • When crossing with conflicts, direct guidelines are found in professional ethics
    Professional ethics doesn’t present answers to every dilemma
  • Ethical ponderings belong to committees, authorities and so forth
    Nope, anyone can and should chip in
  • Some are just more ethical than others
    Anyone can learn to be ethical, it’s not a skill you’re just ‘born with’
  • Large problems are most important due to the fact they bring up ethical discussions into limelight
    But large problems start from smaller ones, so in order to be anticipatory one should stay alert and be willing to intervene in ethical misconducts — whatever the magnitude
  • Ethical evaluation means that people are first and foremost evaluated 
    Not necessarily, since also programs or any material component could be evaluated (people are now and then sensitive when it comes to evaluation, so it’s important to let them know about the procedure)
  • There’s no time for ethical pondering
    Sometimes it’s merely an excuse for walking away from responsibilities
  • Ethical vs. practical
    Ethics is somehow pitted against of being practical, while in reality both may exist at the same time and ethics should be seen as important for evolution’s sake