Another glimpse on schools in Finland

Last year I introduced ‘the most modern school in Finland‘. However, the variety of schools is broad so it might be interesting to check out another kind of a school –
one I deem to represent more generic school environment in Finland. Let’s go!

WP_20180216_15_15_29_Pro.jpg
Lobby featuring lockers. Nothing too fancy 🙂
WP_20180216_15_15_36_Pro
‘Welcome’ in various languages. Internationality is valued here (at least it’s prominent).
WP_20180216_15_10_57_Pro
Second floor is equipped with a ping-pong table to encourage activity during recesses. The picture doesn’t tell, but it seemed very popular.
WP_20180216_15_14_20_Pro
Art (not sure if it’s student-made). Plus pictures of a few old Finnish presidents. Modern art meets classic portraits?
WP_20180216_15_14_43_Pro1
Recycling point for bottles and cans (very common to recycle those in Finland). Also bins for carton and energy waste.
WP_20180216_15_12_52_Pro
No smartboards etc. found here. This school isn’t on the edge of the newest digital trends (should it be is another question) 🙂
WP_20180216_15_12_31_Pro
Teacher’s table. Document camera is a very common instrument in Finnish schools. It’s practical when displaying paper images and written texts to the whole class.

 

Here’s how the most modern school in Finland looks like

The Teacher Training School located in Turku has over 1000 pupils as well as teachers and staff around 140. Further, around 170 subject teacher students intern there yearly. What’s more, this school in particular is rather international since one can hear around 40 languages there.

Both Finnish and English are official teaching languages as pupils may eventually graduate with an International Baccalaureate degree. Due to its diversity with people and school levels, the school offers great experience for a subject teacher student. But without further ado, let’s take a look on the school.

WP_20170925_09_49_03_Pro
Sitting in pairs or groups is often preferred when teachers modify layouts for classes. Additionally, group-working is emphasized in order to enhance social and interaction skills. Tables with wheels mean that it’s easy to organize the class to one’s liking.
WP_20170925_11_25_29_Pro
Out with the old, in with the new: touchscreen-enabled smartboards are becoming de facto displays in each class. Teachers often use e.g. video material during lessons. Yet, notice the three kinds of boards from different ages — there are still options to choose from.
WP_20170925_12_53_10_Pro
Each floor has common areas where one may study, hang around etc. Also openness is appreciated as instead of wide walls some classes have visible glass walls.
WP_20170925_12_53_27_Pro
Common areas also include various tables where pupils may work on assignments. Instead of studying the whole time inside the class, with permission of teachers pupils may do assignments outside the class. Consequently, flexibility and a change of scenery is valued.

Comments and thoughts welcome 🙂